THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 17, 2017 @ 6:32 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 16, 2017 @ 6:32 am
Issued by George Halcom - Payette Avalanche Center
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The avalanche danger is MODERATE at all elevations and all aspects due to human triggered wet-loose, cornice fall, and wind slab avalanches being possible. Two days of rain on snow, and a lack of freezing temperatures until this morning, will make loose wet avalanches our primary concern. Stay away from overhanging cornices.

How to read the advisory


  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
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Most of the wet-loose natural avalance activity has already taken place.  With the lack of freezing temperatures, especially below 7,600 feet, you still run a good chance of starting a loose wet avalanche in steep terrain. Temperatures have cooled down a bit this morning, but are predicted to rise again by tomorrow.

 

Avalanche Problem 2: Cornice
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Give ridge lines with cornices respect, and stay far back from what you might think is the edge of the world, and the start of the cornice. These giants are hanging out, fighting gravity. Use vegetation lines or rock as clues to be sure you are not standing out on a 'trap door' that is a cornice.  

Avalanche Problem 3: Wind Slab
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New snow has fallen above 7,600 feet, along with gusts around 32 MPH on one of our windiest sites (Granite WX Station) which have likely created fresh shallow wind slabs on lee terrain, mainly Northern aspects, that may be sensitive to the weight of a rider or skier. Be cautious on all upper elevation aspects as the wind is variable due to local terrain features. Look for clues like shooting cracks, pillows, or hollow sounding snow, and avoid these areas.

advisory discussion

Snowmobiler/Snowbiker Travel Restrictions: Please respect these closures and other users recreating in them.  Winter Travel Map(East side). You can download the map to the AVENZA app on your phone, and know your exact location while you are out riding.  It is your responsiblity to know where closures exist on the forest.

The Granite Mountain Area Closure is in effect Jan15-March 31, please respect Snowcats operating, signed and unsigned closures and other users in this and nearby areas.  In addition there are other areas on the Payette National Forest that are CLOSED to snowmobile traffic including Jughandle Mt east of Jug Meadows, North of Boulder Mtn, East of Rapid Peak, North of the 20 mile drainage, Lick Creek/Lake Fork Drainage (on the right side of the road as you are traveling up canyon), and the area north of Brundage Mt Ski area to junction "V" and along the east side of Brundage and Sergeants' Mts. with the exception of the Lookout Rd( junction "S").

Photo 1 is from the edge of the signed Brundage Mt. Ski Area just past the Ski Area parking lot, photo 2 is of sled tracks ignoring Catski terrain signs...there is alot of snow out there folks.  Don't be "that" guy on a sled that gives sledders a bad reputation... please respect closures and other users.

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center (FPAC) needs YOU! We are in desperate need of more user support and financial assistance. The avalanche forecast is not a guaranteed service, and is in jeopardy of dwindling down to only a couple of days a week in the near future.We have equipment that is overdue for replacement but lack the funds to purchase new gear including weather station parts and our forecast sleds.  Please help if you can by clicking the DONATE tab above. If you value this life saving information, make a donation or help the FPAC in raising funds for the future.

recent observations

Yesterday, we traveled up Lick Creeck and observed the carnage from the latest rain event. Wet-loose avalance debris was visible in most of the slide paths. We got a report of a skier triggered cornice fall near the Cly drainage, that ended on a positive note.

CURRENT CONDITIONS Today's Weather Observations From the Granite Weather Station at 7700 ft.:
0600 temperature: 30 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 37 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: SW
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 14 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 32 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 2 inches
Total snow depth: NA inches
weather

Today, near the Granite weather station at 7600 feet, expect Snow showers, mainly before noon. High near 31. West southwest wind 9 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Area Forecast Discussion
National Weather Service Boise ID
254 AM MDT Thu Mar 16 2017

.SHORT TERM...Today through Friday...A shortwave trough will
complete its transit of the forecast area this morning, taking
most of the showers off to the east as it departs. However,
showers will linger into the afternoon - especially in the
mountains. Upper level flow will back slightly tonight and Friday,
allowing the next system to send increasing moisture into Oregon.
Some this moisture is forecast to just reach into Harney and
Baker counties Friday afternoon. Otherwise, tonight and Friday
will be dry. After a cooler day today, the result of cold air
advection behind a cold front that moved through overnight, we
will see rapid warming tomorrow. Temps Friday will reach near 70
in much of the Treasure Valley and parts of southeast Oregon,
while the remainder of the lower elevations hits the mid 60s and
the mountains stay generally from 45 to the upper 50s. See the
hydrology section for a discussion of river flooding.

.LONG TERM...Friday night through Wednesday...Pacific cold front
will bring rain showers and cooling Saturday. More significant
cooling Saturday night and Sunday under the upper trough, with
rain showers and mountain snow showers continuing mainly in
northern areas. Gradual warming again Sunday through Tuesday as
upper ridge slowly rebuilds. Pacific moisture will continue to
stream inland even through the ridge for a continuing chance of
showers. Next Pacific cold front and associated upper trough will
come in Tuesday night and Wednesday with more showers, gusty
winds, and cooling. No significant instability for thunderstorms
foreseen at this tim

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the NOAA-NWS
McCall Airport at 5021 feet.
  Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Weather: Rain showers before noon, then a slight chance of rain and snow showers. High near 44. West southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Little or no snow accumulation expected. Partly cloudy, with a low around 28. South wind around 6 mph becoming east after midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 50. East southeast wind 6 to 9 mph.
Temperatures: high 44 deg. F. low 28 deg. F. high 50 deg. F.
Wind direction: west-southwest south becoming east east-southeast
Wind speed: 6 6 6-9
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Granite Mountain at 7700 feet.
  Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Weather: Snow showers, mainly before noon. High near 31. West southwest wind 9 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible. Partly cloudy, with a low around 24. South wind around 9 mph. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 37. South wind 11 to 18 mph, with gusts as high as 28 mph.
Temperatures: high 31 deg. F. low 24 deg. F. high 37 deg. F.
Wind direction: west-southwest south south
Wind speed: 9-11 9 11-18
Expected snowfall: 1-2 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.