THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON February 8, 2017 @ 6:30 am
Avalanche Advisory published on February 7, 2017 @ 6:30 am
Issued by Kent May - Payette Avalanche Center
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The avalanche danger is HIGH above 7000 feet due to human triggered avalanches being very likely in wind exposed terrain. Over the last 24 hours we have seen moderate to high winds which created wind slabs that are widespread. The danger is CONSIDERABLE below 7000 feet where wind slabs are less widespread but storm slab avalanches are likely in steep sheltered terrain. Below 6000 feet the danger is MODERATE.

How to read the advisory


  • Very dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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We have received up to a foot of new snow in the last 48 hours in the upper elevations. The new snow, combined with moderate to strong winds ( wind at Secesh Summit blew 48 mph yesterday afternoon out of the south-southwest), has caused widespread wind slabs to build. Due to the erratic and moderate to high winds, wind slabs could potentially be found on what is normally a sheltered slope, even in the middle elevations. Be weary near ridges and in typical cross-loaded slopes in exposed terrain, or any slope that has small cornices or pillowy looking snow.  Some areas may only have thin and tender slabs that are easy to manage, while other slopes the slabs may be up to 3 feet thick. While we wait for these slabs to heal, I would continue to avoid traveling on or under any wind affected terrain.  If you see cracks shooting out as you are moving or encounter large drifts or stiff snow, move to more sheltered and/or low angle terrain.

 

Avalanche Problem 2: Storm Slab
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In areas that were not affected by the winds over the last few days, it could be possible to trigger a storm slab. While storm slabs stabilize rather quickly by definition, some instabilities can still be found within the storm snow layers where the hardeness (density) of snow layer changes. Because of this, I would stay off of steep slopes today, even if they are small and/or show no signs of wind slab.

 

advisory discussion

Due to the cooling temperatures, I have eliminated loose wet avalanches as a avalanche problem for today. However, in low elevations on very steep slopes you could still trigger a loose wet avalanche.

Snowmobiler/Snowbiker Travel Restrictions:  a quick reminder that the Granite Mountain Area Closure is now in effect, please respect Snowcats operating in this  and nearby areas.  In addition there are other areas on the Payette National Forest that are CLOSED to snowmobile traffic including Jughandle Mt east of Jug Meadows, Lick Creek/Lake Fork Drainage (on the right side of the road as you are traveling up canyon), and the area north of Brundage Mt Ski area to junction "V" and along the east side of Brundage and Sergeants' Mts. with the exception of the Lookout Rd( junction "S").  Please respect these closures and other users recreating in them.  Winter Travel Map(East side). You can download the map to the AVENZA app on your phone, and know your exact location while you are out riding.

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center (FPAC) needs YOU! We are in desperate need of more user support and financial assistance. The avalanche forecast is not a guaranteed service, and is in jeopardy of dwindling down to only a couple of days a week in the near future. Please help if you can by clicking the DONATE tab above. If you value this life saving information, make a donation or help the FPAC in raising funds for the future.

recent observations

Yesterday we traveled up Lick Creek and found a wide range of snow depending on elevation. In the lower elevations the snow pack was damp and heavy up to 3 feet down. In the upper elevations, colder snow was being transported rapidly and building cornices on ridge lines and cross-loaded slopes. 

We have been hearing of avalanches being triggered in the advisory area. If you see or trigger an avalanche please let us know. When it comes to staying safe in the mountains, we are all in this together. Email us at: forecast@payetteavalanche.org

Just sending us a picture and description of the location (aspect, elevation, slope angle), helps us a ton!

 

CURRENT CONDITIONS Today's Weather Observations From the Granite Weather Station at 7700 ft.:
0600 temperature: 13 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 25 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: NA
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: NA mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: NA mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: NA inches
Total snow depth: NA inches
weather

No new snow overnight, and the winds backed off rapidly after 8 pm. 

Today in the upper elevations we are forecasted for snow, mainly after 11am. High near 23. Wind chill values between zero and 6. Breezy, with a south wind 9 to 14 mph increasing to 19 to 24 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 33 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 4 inches possible.

LONG TERM...Wednesday night through Monday...A warm front will move from south to north through the area on Wednesday night and Thursday bringing precip to much of the area. This front will have a warm moisture tap and snow levels are expected to rise to 7000 - 8000 feet on Thursday. The current forecast is favoring the Idaho Central Mountains, so the peaks will see high snow amounts, while lower elevations and valley floor will see the dreaded 'R' word....rain.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the NOAA-NWS
McCall Airport at 5021 feet.
  Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Snow, mainly after 11am. High near 31. Light south southeast wind becoming south 5 to 9 mph in the morning. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible. Snow. Low around 26. Southwest wind around 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible. Snow likely. Cloudy, with a high near 33. South wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.
Temperatures: high 31 deg. F. low 26 deg. F. high 33 deg. F.
Wind direction: south-southeast southwest south
Wind speed: 5-9 9 6-9
Expected snowfall: 1-2 in. 1 in. 1-2 in.
Granite Mountain at 7700 feet.
  Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Snow, mainly after 11am. High near 23. Wind chill values between zero and 6. Breezy, with a south wind 9 to 14 mph increasing to 19 to 24 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 33 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible. Snow likely. Cloudy, with a low around 18. Breezy, with a west wind 23 to 28 mph decreasing to 16 to 21 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 38 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible. Snow likely. Cloudy, with a high near 26. Breezy, with a west wind 14 to 21 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.
Temperatures: high 23 deg. F. low 18 deg. F. high 26 deg. F.
Wind direction: south west west
Wind speed: 9-24 16-28 14-21
Expected snowfall: 1-3 in. 2-4 in. 2-4 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.