THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 22, 2016 @ 6:39 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 21, 2016 @ 6:39 am
Issued by -
bottom line

The avalanche danger today is MODERATE on all slopes and elevations. Warm temperatures over the weekend, lack of overnight freezing, and light rain will make human caused avalanches possible. At the highest elevations, where warm temperatures and rain did not affect the snowpack, new and old wind slabs still exist and will need to be avoided.

How to read the advisory


  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
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Warm temps and sun over the weekend did a great job of warming the surface snow and the top of the snowpack. Now we are having rain fall on an already warm pack causing for the snow to become even wetter. If you are out traveling in avalanche terrain today, and the snow is wet, and you can easily sink in the sloppy snow...might be best to stay off any slopes over 30 degrees. 

Avalanche Problem 2: Wind Slab
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If you are traveling above 7,000 feet in steep terrain on the north half of the compass today you will still be able to find wind slabs of varying age and thickness. The likelyhood of triggerind one of these old slabs is decreasing, however, it is still possible. 

As we pick up new snow today above 7,000 feet watch for wind transport and loading. The new snow combined with light to moderate winds will cause for new windslabs that will range from 2-10 inches thick and will be touchy to skier/snowmobile triggers.

advisory discussion

With winter coming and going around the advisory area, now is not the time to let your guard down when traveling in the mountains. Weather changes avalanche conditions quickly and we need to remember the basics to stay safe until most all the snow is in the rivers. 

If tonights forecasted snowfall comes, expecting avalanche danger to ramp up through the evening and into tomorrow.

recent observations

Warm temps and sun are causing for a wet snow pack on solar aspects. Cornice failures are becoming more widespread and will continue to fail until we get a hard freeze at elevation.

 

Remember your information can save lives. If you see anything we should know about, let us know by clicking the OBSERVATION tab at the top of the page. Or by calling/emailing George, Dave, or Kent directly 208-634-0419 or forecast@payetteavlalanche.org.

If you are getting out and enjoying any spring skiing/riding we would like to know. What did you see, how was the snow? Any information is good information!

weather

No new snow last night at any of the local recording stations and any precip that did fall came as rain below ~8,000 feet. Today winds will increase with approaching cold front. Temps will be in the high 30's to low 40's at 7,500 feet with 1-2 inches of wet snow possible above 6,500 feet. Tonight cold front will bring snow line down to 3,500 feet with 4-8 inches of new snow forecasted overnight for the mountains.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the NOAA-NWS
McCall Airport at 5021 feet.
  Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Showers likely, mainly after noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 45. South wind 6 to 14 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Rain showers before midnight, then rain and snow showers. Some thunder is also possible. Low around 28. South wind 5 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Little or no snow accumulation expected. Snow showers. High near 37. West wind 5 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.
Temperatures: High 45 deg. F. Low 28 deg. F. High 37 deg. F.
Wind direction: south south west
Wind speed: 6-14 5-11 5-11
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. Less than one inch in.
Granite Mountain at 7700 feet.
  Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a high near 41. Breezy, with a south southwest wind 17 to 23 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. Total daytime snow accumulation of around an inch possible. Snow showers. Some thunder is also possible. Low around 21. Breezy, with a south wind 10 to 20 mph becoming west after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 4 to 8 inches possible. Snow showers. High near 32. West northwest wind 11 to 16 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.
Temperatures: High 41 deg. F. Low 21 deg. F. High 32 deg. F.
Wind direction: south-southwest south becoming west west-northwest
Wind speed: 17-23 10-20 11-16
Expected snowfall: around an inch in. 4-8 in. 2-4 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.