THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON February 16, 2016 @ 11:04 am
Avalanche Advisory published on February 15, 2016 @ 11:04 am
Issued by -
bottom line

The avalanche danger is MODERATE above 7,000 feet today due to human triggered avalanches being possible. New snow above 7,000 feet will make triggering a storm slab your main concern. Below 7,000 feet the avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE due to rain falling on snow making natural avalanches possible and human triggered likely. Rain is a RED FLAG for avalanches, so make conservative decisions while traveling below 7,000 feet today.

How to read the advisory


  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Storm Slab
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With 4-10 inches over the last 36 hours in the high country be mindful of storm slabs today above 7,000 feet. This new snow is sitting on a melt freeze crust from last weeks warm up, this is making for a easy sliding bed surface for new snow.

Avalanche Problem 2: Wet Slab
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Rain on snow up to 7,000 feet today could overload the snow pack causing natural avalanches. Use caution traveling in avalanche terrain today below 7,000 feet. Especially near terrain traps.

Avalanche Problem 3: Persistent Slab
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Triggering a slab due to this weak layer has become more difficult over the last few days with the heat, but I would not let my guard down, We are still finding this weak layer in upper elevation wind protected terrain. Pit results and stability testing are pointing toward less likelihood of triggering, but if triggered we are still talking about a potentially unsurvivable hard slab avalanche. Take the time to carefully assess terrain choices on the north half of the compass today. Especially areas where the snow cover is thinner which allows the buried surface hoar to be closer to the surface, and in turn more reactive---especially for snowmachines. This is the same layer that was the cause of the fatal avalanche on January 31st. A persistent weak layer such as this is a low probablility, but HIGH CONSEQUENCE scenario. 

recent observations

Sorry for the delay this morning. We had some website troubles that are hopefully fixed now. For pics and more info from PAC forecasters' field day yesterday check out the Friends of Payette Avalanche Center Facebook page.

 

weather

Rain and snow. High near 40. Wind 22-24 MPH. Total snow 1-2 inches.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.